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Cold and Flu Season

about 1 year ago

What is the difference between a cold and the flu? 

The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

Does being cold make you sick?

Almost every mother has said it: “Wear a jacket or you’ll catch a cold!” Is she right? So far, researchers who are studying this question think that normal exposure to moderate cold doesn’t increase your susceptibility to infection. Most health experts agree that the reason winter is “cold and flu season” is not that people are cold, but that they spend more time indoors, in closer contact with other people who can pass on their germs.


boy sneezing Milk -- Friend or Foe?

 
You'll often hear that you should avoid milk and other dairy products when you have a cold because they increase congestion. However, that's not really the case. In a 1990 study, Australian researchers undertook the disgusting task of collecting and weighing the tissues used by milk drinkers with colds. As it turned out, they didn't secrete any more mucus than people who avoided dairy products. In fact, the National Institutes of Health actually recommends that you eat yogurt, since the beneficial bacteria in some active yogurt cultures helps boost your immune system.
 

"Feed a cold and starve a fever?" 

Today, doctors and dieticians think eating not only can help your body to combat a cold or fever, but also can help you feel better.  Experts advise cold sufferers to fuel their bodies with a healthy, nutrition-rich diet, including plenty of fruits, vegetables and protein sources, and to consume plenty of water, decaffeinated tea and juices.

 

 Exercise: Good or bad for immunity?

Regular exercise is one of the pillars of healthy living. It improves cardiovascular health, lowers blood pressure, helps control body weight, and protects against a variety of diseases. Just like a healthy diet, exercise can contribute to general good health and therefore to a healthy immune system.

 

  Why get a flu vaccine?

The single best way to protect against seasonal flu and its potential severe complications is to get a seasonal influenza vaccine each year.   Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against three influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Three kinds of influenza viruses commonly circulate among people today: influenza B viruses, influenza A (H1N1) viruses, and influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Each year, one flu virus of each kind is used to produce seasonal influenza vaccine.  The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months of age and older get a seasonal flu vaccine by October if possible.  Vaccination is especially important for children younger than 5 years of age and children of any age with a long-term health condition like asthma, diabetes and heart disease. These children are at higher risk of serious flu complications if they get the flu.

 Sources:

Impetigo

about 1 year ago

What is impetigo? 
 
Impetigo, one of the most common skin infections among kids, usually produces blisters or sores on the face, neck, hands, and diaper area.

This contagious superficial skin infection is generally caused by one of two bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes (also called group A streptococcus, which also causes strep throat). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is also becoming an important cause of impetigo.

How can my child get it?
 
A child may be more likely to develop impetigo if the skin has already been irritated by other skin problems, such as eczema, poison ivy, insect bites, and cuts or scrapes due to minor trauma. Good hygiene can help prevent impetigo, which often develops when there is a sore or a rash that has been scratched repeatedly (for example, poison ivy can get infected and turn into impetigo).

What can we do to try and prevent impetigo?
 
Good hygiene practices, such as regular hand washing, can help prevent impetigo. Have kids use soap and water to clean their skin. Pay special attention to areas of the skin that have been injured, such as cuts, scrapes, bug bites, areas of eczema, and rashes such as poison ivy. Keep these areas clean and covered.
 
What are the signs and symptoms that my child may have impetigo?
 
Impetigo may affect skin anywhere on the body but commonly occurs around the nose and mouth, hands, and forearms, and in young children, the diaper area.
 
Types of impetigo
 
There are two types of impetigo:
  • Bullous impetigo (large blisters) 
    • is nearly always caused by S. aureus, which releases toxins that trigger the formation of larger fluid-containing blisters that appear clear, then cloudy.
    • These blisters are more likely to stay longer on the skin without bursting.

  • Non-bullous impetigo (crusted)
    • This type begins as tiny blisters, which eventually burst and leave small wet patches of red skin that may weep fluid. 
    • Gradually, a tan or yellowish-brown crust covers the affected area, making it look like it has been coated with honey or brown sugar. 
    • The non-bullous or crusted form is most common. 
How is impetigo spread?
 
Impetigo may itch and kids can spread the infection by scratching it and then touching other parts of the body. Impetigo is contagious and can spread to anyone who comes into contact with infected skin or other items, such as clothing, towels, and bed linens that have been touched by infected skin.
 
How is impetigo treated?
 
Once antibiotic treatment begins, healing should start within a few days. To keep your child from spreading impetigo to other parts of the body, the doctor or nurse will probably recommend covering infected areas of skin with gauze and tape or a loose plastic bandage. 
 
 What does impetigo look like?
 Picture of impetigo                    Picture of impetigo on the face
 
Information used obtained from Nemours, www.kidshealth.org.  Accessed 10/10/13

Created 10/18/13

The Truth About Lice

about 1 year ago

Where do head lice come from?
 
Head lice have been around for thousands of years. As with any insect, they learn to adapt to their environment in order to survive. We are never going to be completely rid of them, but we can make managing them easier.
 
Do head lice fly or jump?
 
Head lice do not have wings so they cannot fly. They can't jump because they do not have ‘knees’.
 
Can head lice spread disease?

No. A head lice infection is not a life threatening health condition – like similar health conditions such scabies, and ringworm, it is a parent or guardian’s responsibility to treat and care for their child.

Do head lice live in carpets, clothes, hats or sheets?
 
Not for very long.  They require blood to survive. An egg requires warmth to hatch and is the reason why they are laid close to the scalp. The further away from the scalp, the less likely they are to survive. 
 
Is it true that head lice only like clean hair?

No. Head lice are not selective. They don't care if hair is long, short, blonde, brown, washed this morning or last week. As long as they are warm, and have blood to drink, then they are content.

How can we decrease our chances of getting lice?
 
Never share hair brushes, combs, hair pieces, hats, bedding, towels, or clothing with someone who has head lice.  Check your child's head regularly Tying back hair can also help prevent the spread of head lice.
 
What should I treat with?Drawing of a louse

Pyrethrin solutions (RID® or NIX®) should be used according to the package directions.

Do some products work better than others?

Over time, head lice may develop resistance to some chemicals. It is important to check if a treatment you used has worked, and if not, treat again with another product that has a different chemical.

Why do you have to treat again in 7 days?
 
Head lice eggs take 6-7 days to hatch. And when you treat, it’s easy to miss an egg or two. By treating again in seven days, you are aiming to kill and comb out any lice that have since hatched from eggs, which were missed.
 
Should I treat everyone in the family?

It is important to check each family member for head lice but only treat those with eggs or live lice.

What should I wash or treat at home?

Wash all combs and brushes in hot water and soap.  Wash all clothing and bedding in hot water and soap and dry on high heat.  Anything that cannot be washed should be vacuumed or placed in a plastic bag and tied up for 2 weeks. 

Why does my child keep getting re-infected?

Re-infection is the least likely reason for head lice returning in a week's time. If eggs do not die, or were not removed during the original treatment they may hatch and the lifecycle occurs all over again. To break this lifecycle you must re-treat (regardless of treatment method) seven days after the first treatment and continue with weekly checking.

Does my child have to miss school?
 
The Long Beach School District Policy mandates that a child that is found to have live lice will be dismissed from school.  Once the child has been treated with the appropriate shampoo he/she should be rechecked by the school nurse upon return to school.
 
 
 
 Remember
   Having head lice does NOT mean the person has poor hygiene or low    social status.
  
 
Drawing of quill  
 Note:
 
 
The nurses see random cases of  lice throughout the school year.  This is common when groups of  children gather together.  This is not meant to raise any alarm about a  lice outbreak. 

 

 

 Created 10/17/13



Reye's Syndrome: A Real Present Danger

9 months ago


 
Warning:
 
According toThe American Association of Pediatricians, since the
medical community 
issued a public warning against the use of aspirin during viral illnesses, the number of cases of Reye syndrome has decreased greatly. Therefore,we strongly recommend that you do not give aspirin or any medications containing aspirin to your child or teenager when he has any viral illness, particularly chickenpox or influenzaIf he needs medication for mild fever or discomfort, give him acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is approved for use in children six months of age or older; however, it should never be given to children who are dehydrated or who are vomiting continuously.
 

 
The following information is taken from http://www.reyessyndrome.org/what.html accessed 10/30/13. Please see website for further information. 

What is Reye's Syndrome?
 
Reye's Syndrome, a deadly disease, strikes swiftly and can attack any child, teen, or adult without warning. All body organs are affected with the liver and brain suffering most seriously. While the cause and cure remain unknown, research has established a link between Reye's Syndrome and the use of aspirin and other salicylate containing medications, over the counter products, and topical use products.
 
Reye's Syndrome is a two-phase illness because it is almost always associated with a previous viral infection such as influenza (flu), cold, or chicken pox. Scientists do know that Reye's Syndrome is not contagious and the cause is unknown. Reye's Syndrome is often misdiagnosed as encephalitis, meningitis, diabetes, drug overdose, poisoning, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or psychiatric illness.

Reye's Syndrome tends to appear with greatest frequency during January, February, and March when influenza is most common. Cases are reported in every month of the year. An epidemic of flu or chicken pox is commonly followed by an increase in the number of cases of Reye's Syndrome.

When Reye's Syndrome develops, it typically occurs when a person is beginning to recover from a viral illness.

Abnormal accumulations of fat begin to develop in the liver and other organs of the body, along with a severe increase of pressure in the brain. Unless diagnosed and treated successfully, death is common, often within a few days, and even a few hours. A person's life depends upon early diagnosis. Statistics indicate an excellent chance of recovery when Reye's Syndrome is diagnosed and treated in its earliest stages. The later the diagnosis and treatment, the more severely reduced are the chances for successful recovery and survival.

What has aspirin in it? 
 
The following is a list of common over-the-counter medications that contain aspirin.  You should talk with the pharmacist before giving your child any of these medications to see if it contains aspirin products.  For a more complete list of medications go to http://www.reyessyndrome.org/aspirinlists.html. 

 

  • Alka-Seltzer
  • Anacin
  • Ascriptin
  • Bayer
  • BC Powder
  • Bufferin
  • Doan’s
  • Dristan
  • Ecotrin
  • Exedrin
  • Goody’s
  • Kaopectate
  • Norwich
  • Pamprin
  • Pepto-Bismol
  • Sine-Off
  • St. Joseph’s Aspirin
  • Vanquish
  • YSP Aspirin


Safety at Play

9 months ago


The Facts 
  • Brain injury is the leading cause of sports- and recreation-related death.1
  • Children in early adolescence demonstrate less motor coordination for pedaling bicycles as well as differences in bone development that affect motor skills.
  • 11- to 14-year-olds may be reluctant to wear helmets. 2
  • Wearing a helmet when riding wheeled vehicles can reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 85 percent.2
  • Helmets cost approximately $12.00-$15.00.
  • Children who do not wear or use protective equipment are at greater risk of sustaining sports-related injuries.Pictures of protective gear
  • A $5 mouth guard can help reduce injury to the mouth, teeth, lips, cheeks and tongue.  Research shows that mouth guards reduce the risk of losing a tooth, potentially saving $10,000 to $15,000 in lifetime dental costs. 3
  • Children just beginning summer practices for organized sports are particularly vulnerable to suffering some form of heat illness such as dehydration or heat stroke.4
 Your Game Plan
  1.  Wear a properly fitting helmet when riding anything with wheels: bicycle, scooter, roller skates, in-line skates, rip sticks, etc.
  2. Actively supervise children at play.
  3. Don't let children ride bikes, skateboard or scooters in and around cars.
  4. Practice bike safety: learn the rules of the road, wear reflective clothes and stickers, and ride on sidewalks when possible.
  5. When riding wheeled vehicles, don’t wear ear phones that interfere with your ability to hear things around you.
  6. Maintain equipment properly.
  7. Check athletic grounds for hazards like rocks, holes or water.
  8. Always wear appropriate protective gear for the activity - for practice as well as games - and make sure it's the right size and properly adjusted.
  9. Make sure your child has a screening physical before playing sports.
  10. Make sure responsible adults know and enforce the safety rules of the sport, are present to provide supervision, and are trained in first aid and CPR.
  11. To prevent dehydration, make sure kids drink adequate liquids prior to, during and following athletic activities.
  12. Kids should receive adequate rest breaks during practice and games.

 
 
Data picture
 
 
 
 
Do you want some data to convince you that helmets are important?

 Statistics from the 

Fatality Facts: Bicycles - 2010 1

 
Cyclists killed: helmet use
 

 No helmet use      Helmet use      Unknown            Total
 Year Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number
 
 Percent
 

2009

573

91 

52

8

3

0

628

100

2010

429

70

94

15

93

15

616

 100

2011

450

67

100

15

125

19

675

 100
   
 
 
According to a study in Accident Analysis & Prevention April 20132 
 
Helmet use was associated with reduced risk of head injury in bicycle collisions with motor vehicles of up to 74%.
 

 

 

According to Thompson DC, Rivara F, Thompson R in their research article: 

  Wearing a helmet dramatically reduces the risk of head and facial injuries for bicyclists involved in a crash, even if it involves a motor vehicle 3

 
  • Helmets provide a 63 to 88% reduction in the risk of head, brain and severe brain injury for all ages of bicyclists. 
  • Helmets provide equal levels of protection for crashes involving motor vehicles (69%) and crashes from all other causes (68%). 
  • Injuries to the upper and mid facial areas are reduced 65%.
 
References:
  1. http://www.helmets.org/stats.htm#effectiveness Accessed 10/16/13
  2. Accident Analysis & Prevention; Volume 53, 1 April 2013, Pages 78–88: The effectiveness of helmets in bicycle collisions with motor vehicles: A case–control study.  Accessed 10/16/13
  3. http://summaries.cochrane.org/CD001855/wearing-a-helmet-dramatically-reduces-the-risk-of-head-and-facial-injuries-for-bicyclists-involved-in-a-crash-even-if-it-involves-a-motor-vehicle  Accessed 10/16/13.  Wearing a helmet dramatically reduces the risk of head and facial injuries for bicyclists involved in a crash, even if it involves a motor vehicle. Thompson DC, Rivara F, Thompson R; Published Online: January 21, 2009.


 Created 10/18/13

 




School Immunization Records

about 1 year ago

In order to enroll in any public or private kindergarten, elementary, or secondary school in Mississippi, a student must provide the school with a:
 
Certificate of Immunization Compliance (Form 121) MUST be signed by the Regional Health Officer, a physician, or a nurse.
 
or a
 
Certificate of Medical Exemption (Form122 not computer generated).This form MUST be signed by the State Epidemiologist or Deputy State Epidemiologist (refer to the Medical Exemption section for specific information.)
 
The list of immunizations required is specified by the State Health Officer and is promulgated at least annually as directed by state statute. All vaccines are to be given at the appropriate age and intervals according to ACIP recommendations. The required vaccines are listed below.
 
Mississippi School Immunization Laws 
 
 Vaccine/antigen 
 
No. of doses 
 
Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP)b
 
5 c 
 
Polio (IPV)
 4d 
 
Hepatitis B 
 
 3
 
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) 
 
2 c 
 
Varicella (chickenpox) 
 
2 f 
 
 
 Tdap (7th grade entry) 
1 g 
 
 
 
a.  All children entering a Mississippi school (any grade) for the first time will be required to have the above listed immunizations. This includes Pre-K 4 year olds- 12th grade.
 
b. Children entering a Mississippi school after their 7th birthday who do not meet the above DTaP requirements, will need at least 3 total doses of diphtheria/tetanus containing vaccine (Td). Tdap should be used as 1 of the 3 diphtheria/tetanus containing vaccines (preferably as the lst of the 3 doses) for children age 10 years and older. Refer to the Advisory Committee on Immunizations Practices (ACIP) catch up schedule at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html
 
c. If the 4th dose is received on or after the 4th birthday, a 5th dose is not required.
 
d. The final dose in the series should be administered at 4 years of age, regardless of number of previous doses. A 4th dose is not necessary if the 3rd dose was administered at age 4 years or older and at least 6 months following the previous dose.
 
e. MMR vaccine may only be waived if there is a documented physician's diagnosis of previous infection with measles, mumps and rubella disease or a serological confirmation of immunity to measles, mumps and rubella.
 
f. Varicella vaccine will be waived for evidence of past infection, including past history of chickenpox or a serological confirmation of immunity to chickenpox.
 
g. Effective 2012-2013 school year all students entering, advancing or transferring into 7th grade will need proof of an adolescent whooping cough (pertussis) booster, aka Tdap vaccine, before entry into school in the fall. Tdap vaccine given on or after the 7th birthday meets the school requirement.
 
Revised 7/01/2017

Strive for Healthy Kids

9 months ago

Why is childhood obesity considered a health problem?

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey approximately 17%

Children running (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.  Since 1980, obesity prevalence among children and adolescents has almost tripled.
Doctors and scientists are concerned about the rise of obesity in children and youth because obesity may lead to:
  • Heart disease, caused by high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Sleep apnea
  • Social discrimination
These risks may not be immediate but may become problems in adulthood.
 
What to do???

 If you are unsure about your child’s healthy weight, talk to your pediatrician.  If your child is overweight, he or she probably knows it, and needs your support.

  •  Let your child know that she or he is loved and appreciated whatever their weight.  
  • Encourage your child to drink water.  
  • Limit the amount of juice, energy drinks, and caffeinated drinks.
 Children dancing
 
Whether your child has a weight problem or not, your family should:
 
Balance Calories
  •   Remove calorie-rich temptations!
    •  Although everything can be enjoyed in moderation, reducing the calorie-rich temptations of high-fat and high-sugar, or salty snacks can also help your children develop healthy eating habits. 
    • Instead only allow your children to eat them sometimes, so that they truly will be treats!
  • Examples of easy-to-prepare, low-fat and low-sugar treats that are 100 calories or less:
    •  A medium-size apple
    •  A medium-size banana
    •  1 cup blueberries
    •  1 cup grapes
    •  1 cup carrots, broccoli, or bell peppers with 2 tbsp. hummus
 

 Help Kids Stay Active

 Regular physical activity is fun and has many health benefits, including:

  •  Strengthening bones
  •  Decreasing blood pressure
  •  Reducing stress and anxiety
  •  Increasing self-esteem
  •  Helping with weight management
 
Strategies:
  • Children and teens should participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week, preferably daily.  
    • Remember that children imitate adults. 
    • Start adding physical activity to your own daily routine and encourage your child to join you.
  • Limit the time your children watch television, play video games, or surf the web to no more than 2 hours per day. 
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not recommend television viewing for children age 2 or younger.
 
What is Moderate Intensity Physical Activity?
 
Some examples include:
  •  Brisk walking
  •  Playing tag
  • Jumping rope
  • Playing soccer
  • Swimming
  • Dancing
 Source:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html accessed 10/9/13
 Created 10/17/13, Updated 9/3/15


Why is childhood obesity considered a health problem?

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey approximately 17%

Children running (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.  Since 1980, obesity prevalence among children and adolescents has almost tripled.
Doctors and scientists are concerned about the rise of obesity in children and youth because obesity may lead to:
  • Heart disease, caused by high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Sleep apnea
  • Social discrimination
These risks may not be immediate but may become problems in adulthood.
 
What to do???

 If you are unsure about your child’s healthy weight, talk to your pediatrician.  If your child is overweight, he or she probably knows it, and needs your support.

  •  Let your child know that she or he is loved and appreciated whatever their weight.  
  • Encourage your child to drink water.  
  • Limit the amount of juice, energy drinks, and caffeinated drinks.
 Children dancing
 
Whether your child has a weight problem or not, your family should:
 
Balance Calories
  •   Remove calorie-rich temptations!
    •  Although everything can be enjoyed in moderation, reducing the calorie-rich temptations of high-fat and high-sugar, or salty snacks can also help your children develop healthy eating habits. 
    • Instead only allow your children to eat them sometimes, so that they truly will be treats!
  • Examples of easy-to-prepare, low-fat and low-sugar treats that are 100 calories or less:
    •  A medium-size apple
    •  A medium-size banana
    •  1 cup blueberries
    •  1 cup grapes
    •  1 cup carrots, broccoli, or bell peppers with 2 tbsp. hummus
 

 Help Kids Stay Active

 Regular physical activity is fun and has many health benefits, including:

  •  Strengthening bones
  •  Decreasing blood pressure
  •  Reducing stress and anxiety
  •  Increasing self-esteem
  •  Helping with weight management
 
Strategies:
  • Children and teens should participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week, preferably daily.  
    • Remember that children imitate adults. 
    • Start adding physical activity to your own daily routine and encourage your child to join you.
  • Limit the time your children watch television, play video games, or surf the web to no more than 2 hours per day. 
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not recommend television viewing for children age 2 or younger.
 
What is Moderate Intensity Physical Activity?
 
Some examples include:
  •  Brisk walking
  •  Playing tag
  • Jumping rope
  • Playing soccer
  • Swimming
  • Dancing
 Source:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html accessed 10/9/13
 Created 10/17/13, Updated 9/3/15


Why is childhood obesity considered a health problem?

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey approximately 17%

Children running (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.  Since 1980, obesity prevalence among children and adolescents has almost tripled.
Doctors and scientists are concerned about the rise of obesity in children and youth because obesity may lead to:
  • Heart disease, caused by high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • Sleep apnea
  • Social discrimination
These risks may not be immediate but may become problems in adulthood.
 
What to do???

 If you are unsure about your child’s healthy weight, talk to your pediatrician.  If your child is overweight, he or she probably knows it, and needs your support.

  •  Let your child know that she or he is loved and appreciated whatever their weight.  
  • Encourage your child to drink water.  
  • Limit the amount of juice, energy drinks, and caffeinated drinks.
 Children dancing
 
Whether your child has a weight problem or not, your family should:
 
Balance Calories
  •   Remove calorie-rich temptations!
    •  Although everything can be enjoyed in moderation, reducing the calorie-rich temptations of high-fat and high-sugar, or salty snacks can also help your children develop healthy eating habits. 
    • Instead only allow your children to eat them sometimes, so that they truly will be treats!
  • Examples of easy-to-prepare, low-fat and low-sugar treats that are 100 calories or less:
    •  A medium-size apple
    •  A medium-size banana
    •  1 cup blueberries
    •  1 cup grapes
    •  1 cup carrots, broccoli, or bell peppers with 2 tbsp. hummus
 

 Help Kids Stay Active

 Regular physical activity is fun and has many health benefits, including:

  •  Strengthening bones
  •  Decreasing blood pressure
  •  Reducing stress and anxiety
  •  Increasing self-esteem
  •  Helping with weight management
 
Strategies:
  • Children and teens should participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week, preferably daily.  
    • Remember that children imitate adults. 
    • Start adding physical activity to your own daily routine and encourage your child to join you.
  • Limit the time your children watch television, play video games, or surf the web to no more than 2 hours per day. 
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not recommend television viewing for children age 2 or younger.
 
What is Moderate Intensity Physical Activity?
 
Some examples include:
  •  Brisk walking
  •  Playing tag
  • Jumping rope
  • Playing soccer
  • Swimming
  • Dancing
 Source:  http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html accessed 10/9/13
 Created 10/17/13, Updated 9/3/15